Bird flu on the move in the U.S.

Highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza has surfaced on a turkey farm in northwestern Arkansas, marking the fourth outbreak and the third state in the central United States affected by the virus in the past week. The flock of 40,020 turkeys is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified in one turkey flock in Minnesota and two turkey flocks in Missouri.

 

Read more at CIDRAP.

Bats are disappearing

White-nose syndrome, an emerging and devastating fungal disease, is not just a bat problem, experts say. The disease has killed an estimated 5.7 million bats in the U.S. since it was first detected in 2006. Bats can carry serious zoonotic diseases, but if they disappear, the diseases likely will not. In addition, bats play an important role in their ecosystems, including pollen and seed dispersal and insect control, that would pose new problems if bats were wiped out.

 

Read more at Business Insider.

Cattle quarantined near Yellowstone

Several thousand head of cattle have been quarantined in Montana after a cow near Yellowstone National Park tested positive for brucellosis, the livestock disease much feared by ranchers and also carried by elk and bison, state livestock officials said. The disruption comes at a crucial moment for the region’s beef producers, who are in the midst of readying the bulk of their herds for sale at a time of record high prices for the cattle they bring to auction.

 

Read more from Reuters.

Launch of white paper on vector-borne diseases

The International Federation for Animal Health (IFAH) has launched a white paper on vector borne diseases and their impact on animal and human health, with the support of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The paper, which aims to assist in combating vector borne diseases to promote the better health and welfare of animals for the greater good of protecting animals and humans globally, emphasizes the need to understand the diseases and to spread awareness of the most effective ways of managing and preventing them.

Read more at IFAH’s website.

Creation of Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance in Production Agriculture

AHI’s Dr. Richard Carnevale was recently named a task force member for a new group on antibiotic resistance in agriculture. The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) recently announced the creation of the Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance in Production Agriculture. The task force is comprised of representatives from U.S. agriculture colleges/land grant universities and veterinary colleges as well as key representatives from the production animal agriculture community and the pharmaceutical industry.

Cattle could Protect Butterflies, Conserve Prairies

Butterflies, cattle, and the military may seem like unlikely bedfellows, but for native prairies — some of the most threatened habitats in the world — the trio are closely connected. Scientists at Washington State University, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense and the Center for Natural Lands Management, have established a study in order to see how “working landscapes” might support habitat conservation goals.

Read more at AgWeb.

Kansas animal health officials working with USDA officials on PEDv federal order protocols

Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Animal Health is working with animal health industry officials at Kansas State University and around the country to provide a coordinated response to help control and mitigate porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv). Routine and standard disease reporting will help identify the magnitude of the disease in the U.S. and can help determine whether additional actions are needed.

Read more at High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal.